Conservation Matters April 2014

The Texas Land, Water and Wildlife Connection

Three riparian and stream ecosystem workshops coming up

Three riparian and stream ecosystem workshops coming up

The Texas Water Resources Institute’s Texas Riparian and Stream Ecosystem Education Program will host three workshops in April and May for residents interested in land and water stewardship.

April 24 in Weslaco, a free workshop for area residents interested in the Arroyo Colorado watershed will be hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service in Hidalgo County from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. The morning session will be at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, 2415 E. U.S. Highway 83 in Weslaco, and the afternoon session will include a field site tour along the Arroyo Colorado.

A workshop for residents in the Cedar Bayou watershed is set from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. May 8 in Mont Belvieu. The morning session will be at the McLeod Community Center, 10717 Langston Drive, and the afternoon session will include an outdoor stream walk along the bayou. The free workshop will be co-hosted by the AgriLife Extension office in Chambers County, Houston-Galveston Area Council and the Cedar Bayou Watershed Partnership.

The AgriLife Extension office in Kerr County and the Upper Guadalupe River Authority are co-hosting a workshop May 13 in Kerrville for residents in the Upper Guadalupe watershed. It is set from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. with the morning session at the Upper Guadalupe River Authority Lecture Hall, 125 Lehmann Drive, and the afternoon session along the river.

“Trainings for both workshops will focus on the nature and function of stream and riparian zones as well as the benefits and economic impacts from proper functioning riparian systems,” said Nikki Dictson, Texas Water Resources Institute Extension program specialist and coordinator of the program. A riparian zone is the land area adjacent to the bank of a stream, creek or river. 

Dictson said workshop topics will include riparian and watershed management principles, water quality, riparian vegetation, hindrances to healthy riparian areas, stream processes, management practices and local resources.

“The goal is for participants to better understand riparian and watershed processes, see the benefits of healthy riparian areas and know what resources are available to prevent degradation while improving water quality,” Dictson said.

The riparian education program is managed by the Texas Water Resources Institute, part of Texas A&M AgriLife Research,  AgriLife Extension and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University. It is funded through a Clean Water Act grant provided by the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

For more information, contact Dictson or visit texasriparian.org.

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