Urban Stream Processes and Restoration Training - New Braunfels

Urban Stream Processes and Restoration Training - New Braunfels

The training for water and natural resources professionals will focus on natural design processes for stream restoration projects.

Agenda Register Details
Urban Stream Processes and Restoration Training - Waco

Urban Stream Processes and Restoration Training - Waco

This training for water and natural resources professionals will focus on natural design processes for stream restoration projects.

Agenda Register Details
Urban Stream Processes and Restoration Training - Corpus Christi

Urban Stream Processes and Restoration Training - Corpus Christi

This training for water and natural resources professionals will focus on natural design processes for stream restoration projects.

Agenda Register Details

    2018 Urban Stream Processes and Restoration Trainings

    Location

    Date

    Agenda

    Flyer

    Lewisville

    February 21, 2018

    Lewisville Agenda

    Lewisville Flyer

    Seguin

    March 20, 2018

    Seguin Agenda

    Seguin Flyer

    Austin

    April 11, 2018

    Austin Agenda

    Austin Flyer

    The Woodlands

    August 16, 2018

    The Woodlands Agenda

    The Woodlands Flyer

    College Station

    September 27, 2018

    College Station Agenda

    College Station Flyer

    San Antonio

    November 7, 2018

    San Antonio Agenda

    San Antonio Flyer

    Belton

    November 29, 2018

    Belton Agenda

    Belton Flyer

    Clare Entwistle
    clare.entwistle@ag.tamu.edu

    Clare Entwistle, TWRI research associate, provides leadership for various research and extension projects, working with university faculty, state, local and federal governments and stakeholders, to address statewide water related issues.

    Nathan Glavy
    nathan.glavy@ag.tamu.edu

    As Extension program specialist for TWRI, Nathan Glavy works on the development and execution of watershed planning projects and trainings, the watershed coordinator development program, and the water quality and riparian education programs.

      News


      The Texas Water Resources Institute’s Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Program will host an Urban Stream Processes and Restoration Training from 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 29 in New Braunfels for professionals interested in conducting stream restoration projects around the Interstate 35 corridor.


      If you follow Texas Water Resources Institute on social media (@TxWRI), you may have noticed our monthly program spotlights, but in case you missed it, for the month of September the focus was on our Urban Riparian & Stream Restoration Program.


      This month’s txH2O highlight is from the Fall 2017 issue of the magazine and focuses on the effectiveness of low impact development (LID) practices in reducing negative environmental impacts of urban growth.


      The Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Program of the Texas Water Resources Institute will host an Urban Stream Processes and Restoration training from 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Sept. 19 in McKinney for professionals interested in conducting stream restoration projects in and around the Dallas area.


      From a math major to a watershed saver, Clare Entwistle, Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) research associate, knows that protecting riparian areas is important for the future of Texas.


      The Texas Water Resources Institute water team along with Ward Ling, Geronimo and Alligator Creek watershed coordinator, and volunteers recently planted native species along the Urban Riparian and Stream Restoration Program demonstration site located on Geronimo Creek at the Irma Lewis Seguin Outdoor Learning Center in Seguin, Texas.

       


      Riparian and natural resource professionals discussed current innovations and issues in riparian restoration and management at the Urban Riparian Symposium: Balancing the Challenges of Healthy Urban Streams Feb. 15-17 in Houston at Rice University’s BioScience Research Collaborative Building.


      Even in cities, amidst the tall buildings, fast cars and busy people, there are still natural resources that need protection — particularly urban riparian areas, according to Nikki Dictson, Texas Water Resources Institute Extension program specialist. These vegetative buffers found along rivers and streams are complex ecosystems that include the land, plants, animals and network of streams within them.