Conservation Matters June 2018

The Texas Land, Water and Wildlife Connection

  • New issue of txH2O spotlights global impact of Texas water research
    New issue of txH2O spotlights global impact of Texas water research

    The Texas Water Resources Institute recently published the Spring 2018 issue of its magazine, txH2O, highlighting the global impacts of Texas water research.

    Staff writers interviewed former USGS and Mills scholarship recipients to find out where they are now as leaders in the water industry, Texas A&M University researchers studying the water cycle in the tropics and Texas Tech researchers developing a wastewater treatment system for space missions.

  • Rainwater Harvesting for Large Systems workshop set for Junction
    Rainwater Harvesting for Large Systems workshop set for Junction

    A Rainwater Harvesting for Large Systems workshop will be 9 a.m. to noon June 9 at the Texas Tech University – Junction Center, 254 Red Raider Lane in Junction.

    The Llano River Field Station, Texas Water Resources Institute, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, and the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board are hosting the free workshop.

  • EPA accepts Tres Palacios Creek Watershed Protection Plan
    EPA accepts Tres Palacios Creek Watershed Protection Plan

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently accepted the Tres Palacios Creek Watershed Protection Plan, developed by the Texas Water Resources Institute.

    The plan was accepted as it met the agency’s national guidelines for watershed-based plans and effectively outlined a strategy to improve the watershed’s tidal segments impaired by excessive bacteria and depressed dissolved oxygen, plan developers said.

  • Ogallala Water Summit gathers stakeholders to work on next steps to sustain aquifer
    Ogallala Water Summit gathers stakeholders to work on next steps to sustain aquifer

    More than 200 leaders in water management from all eight states that overlay the Ogallala Aquifer traveled to Garden City, Kansas in April to attend the Ogallala Aquifer Summit. Over two days, the leaders shared their expertise and perspectives on effective management practices and support systems, including local, state and Federal policies, incentive and educational programs and markets, with the potential to conserve water and sustain the Ogallala region’s agricultural productivity over the long term.  

  • Research article identifies transboundary hydrogeological units shared between Texas, Mexico
    Research article identifies transboundary hydrogeological units shared between Texas, Mexico

    Dr. Rosario Sanchez, a senior research scientist for the Texas Water Resources Institute; Laura Rodriguez, graduate student in the Water Management and Hydrological Sciences Program at Texas A&M University; and Dr. Cecilia Tortajada, senior research fellow for the Institute of Water Policy, Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore, Singapore, have co-authored a “first-of-its-kind” paper on transboundary aquifers, according to Sanchez.

  • Institute to hold meeting on improving Carancahua Bay water quality
    Institute to hold meeting on improving Carancahua Bay water quality

    The Texas Water Resources Institute, or TWRI, will host a meeting June 7 in Lolita for anyone interested in becoming involved in a partnership to improve and protect water quality in Carancahua Bay.

    The free meeting will be at 1:30 p.m. at the Lolita United Methodist Church, 94 College St. in Lolita.

  • AgriLife Extension offers hurricane preparedness, recovery information
    AgriLife Extension offers hurricane preparedness, recovery information

    With June 1 marking the start of hurricane season, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service is reminding Texans the agency provides a wealth of disaster and emergency preparedness and recovery information.

    “Texas Extension Disaster Education Network website and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Bookstore website have a variety of this type of information, most of it available free of charge or at a minimal cost,” said Dr. Monty Dozier, AgriLife Extension special assistant for Rebuild Texas, College Station.

  • Residents, AgriLife Extension, others work to ‘Harvey-proof’ Houston-area community
    Residents, AgriLife Extension, others work to ‘Harvey-proof’ Houston-area community

    The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, working in collaboration with area residents, the Clear Lake City Water Authority, or CLCWA, and Exploration Green Conservancy, have been collaborating to transform an about-to-be paved golf course into a new kind of nature park that provides recreation while protecting thousands of homes from flooding caused by natural disasters such as Hurricane Harvey.

  • Texas Water Journal published two articles in May
    Texas Water Journal published two articles in May

    The Texas Water Journal, an online, peer-reviewed journal published by the nonprofit the Texas Water Journal and the Texas Water Resources Institute, recently published two papers.

  • ICYMI: Texas+Water publishes second issue
    ICYMI: Texas+Water publishes second issue

    A new monthly newsletter about Texas water news, Texas+Water, just published its second issue. The newsletter is the go-to source for timely, insightful information concerning water issues in Texas. This issue features stories about cultivating stewardship through nature exploration, the Connecting Texas Water Data workshop and a Q&A with Peter Lake, Texas Water Development Board chairman. 

  • Water well trainings and screenings set for July in the Panhandle
    Water well trainings and screenings set for July in the Panhandle

    The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service will offer several Texas Well Owner Network trainings and screenings in July, said program coordinators.

    The Texas Water Resources Institute is partnering with AgriLife Extension and the Texas Well Owner Network on these programs. The events are in collaboration with the Panhandle Groundwater Conservation District, North Plains Groundwater Conservation District and Hemphill County Underground Water Conservation District.

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