Conservation Matters April 2016

The Texas Land, Water and Wildlife Connection

  • Another year of conservation impacts: new IRNR and TWRI annual reports
    Another year of conservation impacts: new IRNR and TWRI annual reports

    From longleaf pine forest management to big-city water conservation technologies, and from tracking Louisiana pine snakes to helping rural water well owners, the Texas A&M Institute for Renewable Natural Resources (IRNR) and the Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI) spent 2015 improving water and natural resources conservation and management all over Texas and the country.

  • 8 reasons why networked, large landscape conservation strategies work
    8 reasons why networked, large landscape conservation strategies work

    The Crown of the Continent is a vast, unique region, with its 18 million acres stretching from Montana to across the Canadian border and holding one of the largest untouched landscapes in North America. It includes Glacier National Park, many different ecosystems and huge swaths of public lands. 

  • Meet a scientist: Wendy Jepson
    Meet a scientist: Wendy Jepson

    For some people, having access to clean water is not as easy as simply turning on a faucet. Some of the United States’ poorest regions rely on inadequate water delivery systems, unaffordable potable water or unclean tap water for their household water use. This is a reality for tens of thousands of households in colonias, underdeveloped communities along the U.S.-Mexico border often lacking basic infrastructure, and it is also a focus of Dr. Wendy Jepson’s research.

  • Photo essay: Navasota River water quality monitoring

    Water quality monitoring on the Navasota River. Water quality monitoring on the Navasota River. Water quality monitoring on the Navasota River. Water quality monitoring on the Navasota River. 

  • Rebuilding monarch numbers: landowners, agencies and cities pitch-in
    Rebuilding monarch numbers: landowners, agencies and cities pitch-in

    When spring migration begins, monarch butterflies emerge from their chrysalises by the millions, preparing for the 2,000-mile, multigenerational journey from Mexico to Canada. Migration is critical for the survival of the iconic North American butterfly, known for its bright orange and black markings, but habitat losses have led to a significant population decline in the past two decades.

  • Record year for whooping cranes in USFWS surveys
    Record year for whooping cranes in USFWS surveys

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) has completed analysis of aerial surveys of the Aransas-Wood Buffalo whooping crane population, the only surviving wild population of whooping cranes in the world.  

  • ‘Forgotten’ minnow rediscovered by AgriLife scientists in West Texas
    ‘Forgotten’ minnow rediscovered by AgriLife scientists in West Texas

    With no more “swimmable” water than thirsty West Texas has, it’s hard to imagine a fish, even a minnow-sized fish could remain “missing” for more than a century. But due to a mistaken identity, such is the case, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist.

  • USGS research shows economic impacts of ecosystem restoration projects
    USGS research shows economic impacts of ecosystem restoration projects

    From restoring sagebrush to rejuvenating watersheds and landscapes after fires, ecosystem restoration can bear substantial economic fruit for local, state and national economies, according to a recent study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

  • New USDA research: feral hogs threaten turkey populations
    New USDA research: feral hogs threaten turkey populations

    This spring more than ever, wild turkeys across the United States are facing an increasing threat from feral swine, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture – Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA-APHIS).

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